The Big Picture
 

 

Armenia is facing a future of desertification, whereby water and topsoil resources will be severely depleted and the country will be unable to support its populace through agricultural means. If the current trend of deforestation continues at the current rate and the significant planting of tree saplings is not performed regularly, Armenia could have virtually no forests left by 2020.

Since the turn of the 19th century, Armenia witnessed a dramatic plunge in forest cover from 25 percent of its territory to the current low, estimated at 8-9 percent. Although comprehensive data on Armenia’s forests has not been gathered in recent years, according to the last inventory of the forests in 1993, the forest cover constituted 334,100 hectares or 11.2 percent of Armenia’s territory.

An estimated 500,000 cubic meters of wood are burned in Armenia every year for fuel. This means over 4,000 hectares of forests are cut for fuel as well as other purposes. The average forest area per Armenian inhabitant is only 0.1 hectare, while for the Commonwealth of Independent States the average is 27 times higher (2.7 hectares per inhabitant). Presently, the mean density of Armenia’s forests is below the point at which they have the ability to regenerate.

The following are some of the key drivers of deforestation in Armenia:

  • The best trees are cut illegally for commercial purposes, such as construction, furniture making, and export

  • Grazing of livestock in forest areas prevents regeneration

  • Lack of education and awareness of the forest’s value

  • Lack of community ownership and responsibility for forests

  • Lack of sustainable forest management practices

A key priority is to reduce the demand for wood by promoting energy efficiency and affordable fuel alternatives such as natural gas and renewable energy. If the need to use wood for heating abates, then the amount of wood being cut each year will be reduced. In addition, a sustainable national forest management plan needs to be developed to help expand the total forested area.

Other steps that need to be taken include:

  • Reforestation--planting trees on a large scale and ensuring their survival

  • Coppicing and tree restoration activities

  • Enforcement of the rule of law to protect forests against illegal cutting

  • Regulatory reform and training to create effective forest management

  • Research and monitoring to support forest management and public participation

  • Public outreach and education, especially of the youth

  • Empowerment of local communities as stewards of their local forests

 
The Big Picture
 

 

Armenia is facing a future of desertification, whereby water and topsoil resources will be severely depleted and the country will be unable to support its populace through agricultural means. If the current trend of deforestation continues at the current rate and the significant planting of tree saplings is not performed regularly, Armenia could have virtually no forests left by 2020.

Since the turn of the 19th century, Armenia witnessed a dramatic plunge in forest cover from 25 percent of its territory to the current low, estimated at 8-9 percent. Although comprehensive data on Armenia’s forests has not been gathered in recent years, according to the last inventory of the forests in 1993, the forest cover constituted 334,100 hectares or 11.2 percent of Armenia’s territory.

An estimated 500,000 cubic meters of wood are burned in Armenia every year for fuel. This means over 4,000 hectares of forests are cut for fuel as well as other purposes. The average forest area per Armenian inhabitant is only 0.1 hectare, while for the Commonwealth of Independent States the average is 27 times higher (2.7 hectares per inhabitant). Presently, the mean density of Armenia’s forests is below the point at which they have the ability to regenerate.

The following are some of the key drivers of deforestation in Armenia:

  • The best trees are cut illegally for commercial purposes, such as construction, furniture making, and export

  • Grazing of livestock in forest areas prevents regeneration

  • Lack of education and awareness of the forest’s value

  • Lack of community ownership and responsibility for forests

  • Lack of sustainable forest management practices

A key priority is to reduce the demand for wood by promoting energy efficiency and affordable fuel alternatives such as natural gas and renewable energy. If the need to use wood for heating abates, then the amount of wood being cut each year will be reduced. In addition, a sustainable national forest management plan needs to be developed to help expand the total forested area.

Other steps that need to be taken include:

  • Reforestation--planting trees on a large scale and ensuring their survival

  • Coppicing and tree restoration activities

  • Enforcement of the rule of law to protect forests against illegal cutting

  • Regulatory reform and training to create effective forest management

  • Research and monitoring to support forest management and public participation

  • Public outreach and education, especially of the youth

  • Empowerment of local communities as stewards of their local forests

 
The Big Picture
 

 

Armenia is facing a future of desertification, whereby water and topsoil resources will be severely depleted and the country will be unable to support its populace through agricultural means. If the current trend of deforestation continues at the current rate and the significant planting of tree saplings is not performed regularly, Armenia could have virtually no forests left by 2020.

Since the turn of the 19th century, Armenia witnessed a dramatic plunge in forest cover from 25 percent of its territory to the current low, estimated at 8-9 percent. Although comprehensive data on Armenia’s forests has not been gathered in recent years, according to the last inventory of the forests in 1993, the forest cover constituted 334,100 hectares or 11.2 percent of Armenia’s territory.

An estimated 500,000 cubic meters of wood are burned in Armenia every year for fuel. This means over 4,000 hectares of forests are cut for fuel as well as other purposes. The average forest area per Armenian inhabitant is only 0.1 hectare, while for the Commonwealth of Independent States the average is 27 times higher (2.7 hectares per inhabitant). Presently, the mean density of Armenia’s forests is below the point at which they have the ability to regenerate.

The following are some of the key drivers of deforestation in Armenia:

  • The best trees are cut illegally for commercial purposes, such as construction, furniture making, and export

  • Grazing of livestock in forest areas prevents regeneration

  • Lack of education and awareness of the forest’s value

  • Lack of community ownership and responsibility for forests

  • Lack of sustainable forest management practices

A key priority is to reduce the demand for wood by promoting energy efficiency and affordable fuel alternatives such as natural gas and renewable energy. If the need to use wood for heating abates, then the amount of wood being cut each year will be reduced. In addition, a sustainable national forest management plan needs to be developed to help expand the total forested area.

Other steps that need to be taken include:

  • Reforestation--planting trees on a large scale and ensuring their survival

  • Coppicing and tree restoration activities

  • Enforcement of the rule of law to protect forests against illegal cutting

  • Regulatory reform and training to create effective forest management

  • Research and monitoring to support forest management and public participation

  • Public outreach and education, especially of the youth

  • Empowerment of local communities as stewards of their local forests

 
The Big Picture
 

 

Armenia is facing a future of desertification, whereby water and topsoil resources will be severely depleted and the country will be unable to support its populace through agricultural means. If the current trend of deforestation continues at the current rate and the significant planting of tree saplings is not performed regularly, Armenia could have virtually no forests left by 2020.

Since the turn of the 19th century, Armenia witnessed a dramatic plunge in forest cover from 25 percent of its territory to the current low, estimated at 8-9 percent. Although comprehensive data on Armenia’s forests has not been gathered in recent years, according to the last inventory of the forests in 1993, the forest cover constituted 334,100 hectares or 11.2 percent of Armenia’s territory.

An estimated 500,000 cubic meters of wood are burned in Armenia every year for fuel. This means over 4,000 hectares of forests are cut for fuel as well as other purposes. The average forest area per Armenian inhabitant is only 0.1 hectare, while for the Commonwealth of Independent States the average is 27 times higher (2.7 hectares per inhabitant). Presently, the mean density of Armenia’s forests is below the point at which they have the ability to regenerate.

The following are some of the key drivers of deforestation in Armenia:

  • The best trees are cut illegally for commercial purposes, such as construction, furniture making, and export

  • Grazing of livestock in forest areas prevents regeneration

  • Lack of education and awareness of the forest’s value

  • Lack of community ownership and responsibility for forests

  • Lack of sustainable forest management practices

A key priority is to reduce the demand for wood by promoting energy efficiency and affordable fuel alternatives such as natural gas and renewable energy. If the need to use wood for heating abates, then the amount of wood being cut each year will be reduced. In addition, a sustainable national forest management plan needs to be developed to help expand the total forested area.

Other steps that need to be taken include:

  • Reforestation--planting trees on a large scale and ensuring their survival

  • Coppicing and tree restoration activities

  • Enforcement of the rule of law to protect forests against illegal cutting

  • Regulatory reform and training to create effective forest management

  • Research and monitoring to support forest management and public participation

  • Public outreach and education, especially of the youth

  • Empowerment of local communities as stewards of their local forests

 
Transforming the Armenian
Landscape

 BEFORE AND AFTER GALLERY
Transforming the Armenian Landscape

 BEFORE AND AFTER GALLERY
 
 
Transforming the Armenian Landscape

 
 

Transforming the Armenian Landscape

 

Copyright © 1994-2017 Armenia Tree Project, a project of Armenian Assembly of America. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 1994-2017 Armenia Tree Project, a project of Armenian Assembly of America.
All Rights Reserved.